We asked, you said, we did

Below are some of the issues we have recently consulted on and their outcomes.

We asked

The company known as Scotts of Thrapston Limited, 4 Bridge Street, Thrapston, Northamptonshire, NN14 4LR has applied to North Northamptonshire Council to vary their existing permit for the working of timber and manufacture of wood-based products, EPR/EN/9b, to include a biomass boiler as a directly associated activity.

Representations were invited from interested parties.

You said

No responses or representations were made.

We did

The existing permit will now be varied. For more information about Environmental permits please visit the NNC webpage at https://www.northnorthants.gov.uk/environment/environmental-permits

We asked

Residents were asked to give their views on a proposed new PSPO for Rushden town centre. Rushden has been experiencing significant anti-social behaviour in the town centre.

The proposed restricted area that the PSPO will cover was set out, along with the suggested prohibitions. Residents were asked to say whether they agreed with the making of the PSPO overall; the proposed restricted area; what they felt about each prohibition and whether additional areas of the town, or other prohibitions should be considered for inclusion in the order.  
 

You said

NNC received 148 responses, with 83% of respondents saying they strongly agreed or agreed with making the PSPO.

The proposed restricted area was very widely regarded as the critical area for the PSPO to cover.

ASDA was identified as a key area for consideration of extending the PSPO restricted area.

Several other roads were identified further out from the town centre. However, for practical reasons with enforcement, these couldn’t be included.

The prohibitions were widely regarded as the key ones.

Many respondents offered other comments about their own experiences of issues in the town centre.
 

We did

All views helped support the PSPO proposals when they were considered and approved by NNC’s Executive at its meeting on 14 January 2024.

The PSPO is now being implemented and will be formally sealed as a legal order to start shortly. It will be in place for three years, when NNC will be required to review it and either extend for a further three years, with or without amendments, or discontinue with it.

We asked

In Autumn 2023, we conducted a survey seeking views on a proposed new way of delivering activities and respite (short breaks) for disabled children in Northamptonshire. It was important that we gave as many people the opportunity to feedback via an electronic survey and through face to face sessions. 

Conducted throughout October and November, the survey received an overwhelming response, with 150 individuals contributing their valuable insights and a further 134 attending the various workshops. 

You said

The following sets out the key findings:

  • The idea of a single referral pathway is beneficial to help avoid families having to tell their stories repeatedly.
  • Any assessment that is already in place should be used for access to the short break’s services. Some respondents did want to keep self-referrals.
  • Respondents agreed with the principle of reallocating funding, however, they did not agree with closing the residential short breaks unit 1 day a week.
  • That daytime activities preferred included swimming, activities involving animals, cooking or musical activities.
  • The need for better links with activities already taking place in communities and support for children and young people to access them.
  • The need for 1:1 or 2:1 staffing, followed by secure environments and small groups to access services.
  • The sleep service should not be added to the short breaks group of services.
  • Sensory impairment services should not be added to the short breaks group of services.
  • Adding personal care and support services to the short breaks group of services would be positive.
  • That in general, respondents agreed with some parts of the proposals but not all of it.

We did

The survey covered a broad spectrum of topics allowing us to review the entire provision and receive appropriate feedback. Thanks to this, a new model of short breaks and respite will be implemented; this will consist of:

  • A single referral route into the short break’s services.
  • Existing assessments being used to access the short breaks services and allowing parents to self-refer.
  • Residential short breaks unit reducing the bed capacity rather than closing 1 night a week; analysis shows this will still enable the need to be met.
  • The Sleep Service (and budget) will not be included in the Short Breaks group of services.
  • The Sensory Impairment services will not be included in the short breaks group of service.
  • Consideration of adding PCaS services during the 2nd year of the contract after modelling the viability of this.

Next steps 

  • Commissioning the new services to be in place by November 2024.
  • Complete a whole service review of the sleep service and agree a joint plan to reduce the waiting list.
  • Ensure the transition from the current services to the new services are as smooth as possible to avoid any negative impact on children, young people, and their families.

To read more and see the report you can visit the Northamptonshire Childrens Trust News page

We asked

NNC sought the views on the review of the content of three separate Dog Control PSPOs currently in place in the form legacy district and borough council areas (East Northamptonshire, Kettering and Wellingborough) and incorporate the Corby area into one overall PSPO relating to Dog Control.

A PSPO allows the council to enforce key restrictions including dog exclusion in all fenced children’s play areas, county wide controls on dog fouling, dogs on lead orders in places such as cemeteries and the ability to request dogs to be placed on leads when required.

Proposed changes included:

  • Remove the requirement that dogs must be kept on a lead no more than 1.5m in length in prescribed areas – currently this is only within the Kettering area.
  • Remove the restriction that a person may not take more than 6 dogs onto any land at any time – currently this is only within the Kettering area.
  • Elements of the existing orders are replicated to cover the former Corby Borough Council area, including dog exclusion from all enclosed or fenced off children’s play areas, dog fouling control and a requirement to have dogs on leads in certain areas such as churches and cemeteries.

You said

There were 72 responses to the online survey with 72% of respondents strongly agreeing or agreeing with the contents of the proposed PSPO.

Several representations were made in relation to additional considerations, including Fermyn Woods, Irchester main hub area and Corby areas. Full details can be found in the consultation appendix as part of the Executive papers for the Executive meeting held on 16 November 2023.

We did

The draft Public Spaces Protection Order (Dog Control) Order 2023 was approved by Executive on 16 November 2023 and is now in force. Full details can be found on the NNC website PSPO page.

We asked

Residents, organisations and business were invited to give their view on the proposed Corby Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan which was created in collaboration with WSP and Brightwayz.

The LCWIP provides a strategic approach to identifying cycling and walking improvements at a local level and enable the long-term approach to developing networks for the next ten years.

The Corby LCWIP had a range of engagement and consultation with stakeholders and the public throughout the development of the plan. This engagement included a series of workshops with key stakeholders and residents that were held during the development of the LCWIP as well as a dedicated feedback section on the Commonplace website.

Participants at the most recent public consultation were able to comment on:

  • Proposed routes and corridors
  • Priority of individual routes and corridors
  • The overall LCWIP report

You said

The online public consultation was promoted to stakeholders/residents who had already been involved in the development of the LCWIP as well as to the wider population through various media. In addition, various events were attended to raise the profile of the consultation and to provide assistance to those wanting to comment upon the proposals.

There were 105 responses in total:

  • Only 14% of the respondents disliked or mostly disliked the plan.
  • 59% of contributions loved or liked the plan.
  • The remainder of 27% were neutral contributions.

The walk routes most often identified by respondents as being important to them were:

  • Town centre 25%
  • Corby Old Village 16.1%
  • Oakley Road 13.7%
  • Weldon Road 11.3%

The cycle routes identified by respondents as being important to them were:

  • East- Station to Weldon/Priors Hall Park South 26.5%
  • North East – Train station to Priors Hall Park 20.5%
  • North – Rockingham triangle 15.7%
  • South East – Stanion to train station 14.5%
  • West – Cottingham to town centre 13.9%
  • South West – West Corby SUE to town centre 9.0%

Numerous detailed comments on each of the route proposals were provided.

We did

Each of the responses and comments have been analysed and considered. A Consultation Report that summarises the findings of this analysis has been prepared and will be reported to NNC members (along with a report on the overall engagement for the overall LCWIP process) when approval of the Corby LCWIP proposals will be sought. The report includes proposals to reflect all comments received and ensure they are considered as the design of the route proposals is developed further.

We asked

As part of the Active Communities Framework Consultation residents were invited to have their say on the future provision of sport and leisure in North Northamptonshire Council area via completion of an online community survey.

You said

656 residents completed the community survey. 

We did

The results of the community survey are being analysed by Max Associates (consultants) together with other survey results which were sent and completed by; National Governing Bodies (Sport), Schools, Town and Parish Councils, Voluntary Sector and Sports Clubs.  Workshops and consultations with external partners/stakeholders and North Northamptonshire Councillors also took place.

The draft report from Max Associates will be considered by the Steering Group in February 2024 and a final report will be taken to the Council in August 2024. We will update you after this time.

We asked

We were considering the extension of the current PSPO for a further three years following its expiration in November 2023. The PSPO covers the Wellingborough Town Centre area and feedback was sought from residents and stakeholders. The current PSPO had been successful in tackling issues of anti-social behaviour, drug taking and criminal activities.

You said

The response rate was very low. Four of the five respondents agreed with the extension for a further three years, whereas the final respondent wasn’t sure. Respondents told us how important the PSPO was to the local area.

We did

The PSPO has been extended for a further three years from 2023 to 2026 with no changes to the prohibitions or the restricted area it covers.

We asked

We were considering the extension of the current PSPO for a further three years following its expiration in November 2023. The PSPO covers alleygates in the Isebrook and Victoria Ward and feedback was sought from residents and stakeholders. The current PSPO had been successful in tackling issues of anti-social behaviour, drug taking and criminal activities.

You said

Respondents told us how important the PSPO was to the local area. Respondents were asked whether they agreed the gates on the alleyways had helped reduce anti-social behaviour and crime, and whether the PSPO should be extended for a further three years. Nineteen responses were received of which 18 said they agreed with both questions.  

We did

The PSPO has been extended for a further three years from 2023 to 2026 with no changes to the prohibitions or the restricted area it covers.

We asked

The company known as Marsh Industries Limited, Units 3-13 Addington Park Industrial Estate, Little Addington, Northamptonshire, NN14 4AS applied to North Northamptonshire Council for a permit to operate an installation for the polymerisation or co-polymerisation of any pre-formulated resin or pre-formulated gel coat which contains any unsaturated hydrocarbon, where the activity is likely to involve, in any period of twelve months, the polymerisation or co-polymerisation of 100 tonnes or more of unsaturated hydrocarbon. Comments on the application were sought.
 

You said

There were 0 responses to the consultation process

We did

The application has been approved.

We asked

We sought the views on proposed revision of our home to school transport policies for 2024-2025 onwards. The policies set out what assistance we provide and how to access it, to enable parents to easily understand whether their child is eligible for free home to school travel or whether there is any other help provided, using discretionary powers.

The possible changes put forward in the consultation fell into two categories:

1. Format and language used in the policy document.

2. Substantive changes to entitlement to free and discretionary transport:

a. ceasing to provide free transport to linked schools unless it is the nearest suitable school with places. This proposal would comply with the legislation.
b. Making changes to the provision of discretionary transport:

Options relating to discretionary transport:

• Withdraw all discretionary transport (all age groups).
• Withdraw discretionary transport for Post 16 only.
• Cease to guarantee a discretionary seat for those applying by mid-May.
• Increase fares to recoup more of the expenditure and cease to undercut the commercial market.

You said

We received 514 online responses, and 4 written responses, which were reviewed and used to support the Home to School Transport - Policy Revisions for Statutory School Age Pupils 2024/25 report, which was discussed at North Northamptonshire Council Executive meeting on 12 July 2023.

The consultation primarily considered the discretionary element of home to school transport.

You can also view the full report and appendices pack.

We did

On 12 July 2023, the Executive considered all the supporting papers and resolved to agree the recommendations made.

Additionally, Members recognised the unique situation in relation to Prince William School, and asked Officers to explore alternative arrangements for students residing in the former East Northants area, and in particular those in and around the Thrapston area.   A suitable approach was agreed with Members and local MPs to mitigate the negative impact on residents in that area.  Further work is still ongoing both with the school and with transport providers to meet the demand for transport in that area.

We asked

Public consultation on the Scope and Options and associated Sustainability Appraisal Scoping Report is the first stage of preparing the Gypsy and Traveller Local Plan. At this stage the Council invited views on what should be included in the plan and a range of high-level options to address issues within the plan.

You said

The consultation at this first formal stage in the plan making process encouraged many helpful and constructive comments and can be considered valuable with nearly 100 individual responses received. A Scope and Options Consultation Summary Report will be reported to Planning Communities Executive Advisory Panel on 19 July 2023.

Agenda for Planning Communities Executive Advisory Panel on Wednesday 19 July 2023

We did

Feedback received will be used to help prepare the draft Gypsy and Traveller Local Plan. A formal consultation on the draft Gypsy and Traveller Local Plan is expected to take place later in 2023.

We asked

In April and May 2023, we launched a consultation to seek and understand the views of families, staff and other professionals on the future shape of the way that short breaks are provided for children with disabilities.

This was to review and check the feedback received from families in 2020 about what was not working well with short breaks and what they wanted to see in the future. The online survey asked parents/carers, staff, practitioners and members of the public about their feelings on the proposed new model of short breaks, such as, having one lead provider for all of the short breaks services. It also asked about their needs and preferences of what short breaks could look like in the future.

You said

There were 195 responses to the online consultation, with the highest proportion from parents/carers of someone who uses the Short Breaks services (32%), followed by members of staff working in Short Breaks services (21%).

Summary of responses: 25% of responses agreed with bringing residential and non-residential short breaks services together to support the needs of children with disabilities. 32% of responses agreed with having a staff team that could flex support across residential and non-residential short breaks and potentially also support in the home. 40% of responses agreed with one referral point and joined up assessment and reviews for all of the short breaks services. 16% of responses did not feel that improved access and flexibility of non-residential short breaks would reduce their need/or the need for residential short breaks. 12% of responses asked for more support when using direct payments.

We did

All responses have been considered and will help to shape the future direction for short breaks. The information received will be used in the development of the specification for the tender of short breaks. The new model of short breaks will be in place by Spring 2024. There will be a further consultation survey and some workshops happening in Autumn 2023 which will give families and practitioners another opportunity to engage and discuss the new proposed model of short breaks.

We asked

North Northamptonshire Council (NNC) promoted First Renewable Developments’ public consultation on the draft Masterplan for Kettering Energy Park. Comment were requested on the comprehensive Masterplan, which will:

  • Define development boundaries and also the renewable/low carbon technologies and land uses to be developed on the site;
  • Make provision for a mix of complementary employment uses to facilitate development of local knowledge, expertise and research and development;
  • Demonstrate how the proposal will contribute towards meeting the energy needs of existing and planned development, including East Kettering SUE, strategic development at Junction 10 of the A14 and employment uses associated with the site;
  • Create a model for zero carbon energy through the installation of exemplary energy efficiency standards in buildings which use energy produced on-site in their operation.

You said

212 representations were received in total, 89 were received via the online feedback form and the remaining 123 were received via email.

We did

The results of the consultation are currently still being analysed and will be reported to a future meeting of the Planning Communities Executive Advisory Panel. Reports are still being prepared and will be shared once available.

We asked

We asked your views on the Kettering LCWIP which was undertaken using the Commonplace consultation platform at https://ketteringtravel.commonplace.is/ We sought views on: overall view of the LCWIP proposals / comments on the overall plan and on the individual route proposals / which Individual Routes residents thought should be prioritised. The aim was to ascertain the level of support for the cycling and walking plan, which routes should be prioritised for further design and development and also to obtain comments to improve the LCWIP and the future design of the proposals.

You said

There were 169 responses in total:

  • 81% of respondents were either happy or satisfied with the overall LCWIP
  • Only 3% were unhappy with the LCWIP
  • No clear priority order for the route proposals were identified by the respondents, but those routes identified most often for priority were routes 3, 1A, 5, 7, 1B, 8, 6 and 8A
  • Numerous detailed comments on each of the route proposals were provided

We did

Each of the responses and comments have been analysed and considered. A Consultation Report that summarises the findings of this analysis has been prepared and will be reported to NNC members (along with a report on the overall engagement for the overall LCWIP process) when approval of the Kettering LCWIP proposals will be sought. The report includes proposals to reflect all comments received and ensure they are considered as the design of the route proposals is developed further.

We asked

The Council sought feedback on the draft proposals for a balanced revenue budget for 2023/24 and the medium-term financial plan for the next two years. The budget consultation period commenced on 22 December 2022 and closed on 27 January 2023.

The budget proposals set out a detailed spending strategy for the authority for the financial year 2023/24 as well as outlining the medium-term financial plan for the next two years. The budget proposed a balance net revenue budget for 2023/24 at £336 million.

The main proposals were:

  • To increase Council Tax by 4.99%, comprising a ‘core’ Council Tax increase of 2.99% covering all services and a further 2% for the adult social care precept, which is the maximum amount permitted. This would contribute an additional £9m per year and would represent a Band D level of Council Tax of £1,657.51 in 2023/24, or the equivalent of £31.88 per week.
  • Draft Capital Programme 2023-26.

However, respondents were invited to comment on any proposal within the Draft Budget.

You said

Using the various means available to consultees, local people and organisations contributed to the North Northamptonshire Council Draft Budget 2023/24 consultation 453 times.

Council Tax increase proposals:

  • 33.9% of respondents said they strongly agreed or tended to agree with the proposal to increase core council tax by 2.99%, whilst 58.4% said they strongly disagreed or tended to disagree with the proposal.
  • 36.1% of respondents said they strongly agreed or tended to agree with the proposal to add an adult social care precept of 2% to council tax, whilst 49.2% said they strongly disagreed or tended to disagree with the proposal.

Feedback was received that the impact of the proposed standardised approach for grants for community centres would have resulted in a reduction in grants to a number of community centres.  In light of the feedback, the Leader and the Executive revised the final budget published on 1 February with the removal of this proposal.

For more information about your feedback please see:

Appendix E – Draft Budget 2023-24 Consultation Analysis Report

We did

On Thursday 23 February 2023, the North Northamptonshire Council approved the 2023 to 2024 budget for North Northamptonshire.

The report before Council presented a balanced revenue budget for 2023/24 as well as outlining the medium-term financial plan for the next two years.

Through its budget, the Council will: 

  • Invest in the region of £57m in protecting and improving local services.
  • Continue to improve local schools, town centres, transport and rural neighbourhoods.
  • Tackle climate change, continuing the use of a dedicated £1m fund for this purpose.
  • Invest in adult social care and in care and support for children and families.
  • Help those on low income by maintaining the Local Council Tax Support Scheme at the current level of 25%.
  • Continue to support and develop the local economy, housing, education and skills.
  • Provide grants to local community and voluntary organisations.

Council Tax: The Council approved an increase in council tax of 4.99%, which includes the 2% adult social care precept and is the maximum increase permitted by Government.

This increase will contribute about an additional £9m per year and represents a Band D level of Council Tax for North Northamptonshire Council of £1,657.51 for 2023/24.

This Band D figure does not include the Council Tax for individual Town and Parish Councils or the Council Tax set for Fire and Police by the Northamptonshire Police, Fire and Crime Commissioner.

Capital Programme: Final proposals for capital projects were also approved, totalling £109.1m over a three-year period. General capital projects make up £65.4m of this amount while the Housing Revenue Account is £43.7m.
 
There is also a Capital development pool - totalling £190.2m - for the progression and prioritisation of key schemes. 

Housing Revenue Account: This year’s Housing Revenue Account (HRA) sees a balanced budget for the two Neighbourhood Accounts.

There will also be a rent increase of 7% for the next financial year, which accords with the Government’s rent setting policy for 2023/24. Any funding received by the HRA is retained within the HRA and will be used to support housing improvements and maintenance.

For more information about the budget, please see:

Council papers for meeting held on 23 February 2023

Draft minutes of Council meeting held on 23 February 2023

We asked

The Council were seeking the views on their proposed strategy to transform the current services in order to deliver the highest quality assessment, re-ablement and enablement to support people to live their lives independently and be ambitious for their future.

The public consultation was carried out by the Council’s Consultation and Engagement Team and the Adult Social Care Provider Service. The consultation set out the proposals and enabled both online and non-digital means of participation, in accordance with nationally recognised good practice.

Eighteen face-to-face information and engagement sessions were held, reaching over 140 respondents total, each providing valuable feedback and questions. Responses from these sessions have directly fed into the consultation feedback and FAQs that are included within the consultation hub website.

You said

In total, 253 respondents filled out a questionnaire, either partially or fully, and six written submissions. 18% of the respondents were users of Adult Social Care, 29% were members of the public, 41% were NNC staff & councillors and 12% had a third-party interest. The majority of respondents agreed with the principles proposed for the Transforming NNC Adult Social Care Provider Services.

Some respondents offered feedback to say that there was a need for user friendly language, and the consultation had too much jargon and was too wordy.

Respondents identified some missing principles and areas that could be strengthened including: 

  • Ensuring adequate staff training and pay and reward was put in place, and making sure that there was a clear career path for staff working in our services.  
  • Understanding possible financial implications of having long term support provided mostly by the independent care market.  
  • Keeping support provision very localised. 
  • Not just focusing on the short term but increasing longer term thinking, so people can live more independently.  
  • Person-centred care and assessment with regular reviews.  
  • Collaboration with the Integrated Care System (ICS), Healthwatch and other organisations.  

We did

The responses were analysed and then presented to Cllr Helen Harrison, Executive Member for Adults, Health and Wellbeing and David Watts, Executive Director for Adults, Health Partnerships and Housing on 03 February 2023. Having considered the consultation feedback they have made the decision to implement the strategy using the delegated decision making process that was approved by the Councils Executive on 13 October 2022.

Some people said they found the strategy a little difficult to read and that some additional principles could be included or strengthened. We feel these are really good suggestions and will make some amendments to the strategy document to explain some of the terms we have used but this won’t change the overall strategy. We will also use the feedback to help shape phases 2 and 3 of the strategy, will use less jargon, and we will make sure that future correspondence will be simplified.

In implementing the strategy, we will change our focus from providing longer-term provision to one that delivers services which promote opportunities and independence for people. We will still consider if there are any services, that the care market struggles to provide, that it would be best for the council could deliver even if they provide longer-term care. These will be judged on a case by case basis and may apply to some of those services in phase 2 and phase 3 of the strategy.

We will work to develop a capital strategy with a view to invest in a younger adult’s purpose built unit that provides flexible assessment, transitions matching (for children moving to adult services and wanting to live more independently), and to support North Northamptonshire residents that are currently supported out of area to return to North Northamptonshire with the right support. Any proposed development will be based on current best practice examples.

Over the last few months, a number of residents at Beech Close, and their families, chose to look at other services as they could see that whatever decision was made that people would have to leave for up to three years whilst any work was carried out and the final resident has recently moved into their new home and service. As a result, and in line with our new strategy, we will now use the money that was used to run Beech Close to improve the services and provision that remain, whilst we support staff to find alternative roles. We will make sure that our staff receive a comprehensive training and development package of support to enable them to carry out new roles and are able to deliver services that will be providing re-ablement. We will also review our job descriptions to make sure that staff are adequately rewarded for the work they undertake.

The adoption of our new strategy helps us to progress the work to bring the Thackley Green Specialist Care Centre in Corby into North Northamptonshire Council’s provider services. We hope to base Therapy and Reablement staff from Reablement North at the Specialist Care Centre and look at how we can work in closer partnership with local health partners to support people to gain or regain their independence. By doing this we will be able to support people to move people through bed based and community reablement and back to their homes more quickly and confidently.

By implementing the strategy we expect to reduce spend in the independent care sector through not purchasing Discharge to Assess (D2A) beds at inflated market rates and by achieving better reablement outcomes which will lead to reduced length of stay, or later admissions to residential care, and deliver better outcomes for the people of North Northamptonshire.

We asked

The Council commissioned specialist consultants to undertake a research survey to understand how and where people like to shop, spend their leisure time and use their town centres. The survey is part of a wider Retail Capacity Study for North Northamptonshire that will inform the preparation of planning policies and strategies for town centres.

You said

The survey methodology involved contacting around 1,300 households in the area to gain a representative sample of residents living across North Northamptonshire. The outcomes of the household survey will be included within the Retail Capacity Study, which is expected to be finalised in June 2023.

We did

The findings from the household survey will inform the Retail Capacity Study, which is a technical evidence document that will underpin the emerging planning policies within the North Northamptonshire Strategic Plan. The timetable for the Strategic Plan and other planning policy documents is currently under review; however, regular update reports relating to the this and the technical evidence base work are presented to Members via the Council's Planning Communities Executive Advisory Panel (formerly Planning Policy Executive Advisory Panel). The latest planning policy work programme was presented to Members at the Panel meeting on 30th January 2023, explaining the next stage in preparing the Strategic Plan will be the Options Consultation. The Retail Capacity Study will inform this next stage in the preparation of the Strategic Plan, which is scheduled for consideration by Members at the Planning Communities Executive Advisory Panel meeting on 13th September 2023.

We asked

The Council consulted on how routes for walking, wheeling and cycling in Corby can be made more attractive as part of the town’s new Local Cycling and Walking Infrastructure Plan (LCWIP), and sought feedback on specific junctions, routes or areas which discourage people from using them, and asked these could be improved.  

You said

Over 900 people visited the website with 64 people leaving 198 comments.  You can view the results in our consultation summary document.

We did

The results from the consultation were used to inform which corridors were audited as part of creating a network of routes to form the draft Local Cycling and Walking Plan (LCWIP), and shared at a key stakeholder workshop on 5 December 2022. 

As a direct result of the consultation, there were some additional secondary and future routes which have been added and some of the existing corridors were modified slightly to reflect the comments made. 

Feedback received will be used to help draft the Local Cycling and Walking Plan (LCWIP).  The draft LCWIP will be subject to public consultation during 2023.

You can continue to provide feedback via the Commonplace platform at: Have Your Say Today - Corby Walking & Cycling Plan

We asked

Residents were given an opportunity to share their views on potential additional locations for on-street electric vehicle charging points in 21 sites across seven towns in North Northamptonshire. 

You said

Resident engagement letters were sent to 1,260 addresses bordering the 21 sites where on-street charging points were proposed. We received 156 responses (150 online and 6 paper surveys). Overall, the feedback received from respondents was positive, with 63% supporting the installation of electric vehicle charging infrastructure. 25% of respondents stated they were considering buying an electric vehicle in the next 0-2 years, with 68% stating they will be buying electric in the next 5 years – reflecting the strong demand for more charging points. Of the 21 sites under consideration, most received an even split of for/against responses, with several sites receiving strong support and 8 sites receiving strong objections due to perceived impact on parking availability. 

We did

The responses to the engagement activity were reviewed by the project team on a site-by-site basis. The detailed drawings for each site, along with on-street images and the site selection criteria were reviewed against the comments received. This was done for all sites, regardless of whether there was overwhelming support, or overwhelming objection, to the installation of on-street charging points at a particular location. The decision-making process weighed up the growing need and demand for on-street charging points for residents without off-road parking, against objections based on a perceived loss of parking space. The project team agreed on which sites to proceed with and, submitted their recommendation for approval. It was recommended that 3 of the 21 sites be removed from our plans based on the objections received as part of the engagement activity. This recommendation was approved. 

We asked

The Council were seeking the views on installing CCTV in the William Knibb and All Saints Ward, Kettering, following the Northamptonshire Office of Police, Fire and Crime Commissioner funding from the Home Office. The funding is specifically designed for areas that need to tackle theft, robbery and burglary – known as acquisitive crimes.

You said

We received 43 responses. 97.6% of respondents felt that installing CCTV in the area would help to deter crime. 97.6% of respondents felt that installing CCTV in the area would increase their feeling of safety.

We did

The high proportion of residents whose opinion that CCTV in the area would help deter crime and make them feel safer, has resulted in the decision being taken to start installation of CCTV in the William Knibb and All Saints Ward Area.